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3 edition of Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved found in the catalog.

Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved

United States. General Accounting Office

Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved

report

by United States. General Accounting Office

  • 196 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by U.S. General Accounting Office in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Veterans -- Medical care -- United States.,
    • Herbicides -- War use.,
    • Agent Orange -- Toxicology.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby the Comptroller General of the United States.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsUB369 .U55 1979
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 38 p. ;
      Number of Pages38
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4064102M
      LC Control Number79601896

      Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p. the long term health effects of exposures to herbicides in Vietnam, was supposedly conducted to determine if exposure could, in fact, be estimated After four years and approximately $63 million in federal funds, the CDC concluded that an Agent Orange exposure study could not be done based on military records. 44 This conclusion was based on.

      From to , the United States Air Force (USAF) sprayed various herbicide mixtures (chemicals that kill plants) in South Vietnam. The purpose of the spraying was to defoliate jungle growth to deprive the Communist forces of ground cover, and to destroy enemy crops to restrict food supplies. The most extensively used of these herbicide mixtures was known as Agent Orange, a mix of.   The latest and final in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to .

        Herbicides including Agent Orange were sprayed by United States forces for military purposes during the Vietnam War (–) at a rate more than . VA followed suit by drafting regulations to coincide with the statute by defining the term as follows: “‘herbicide agent’ means a chemical in an herbicide used in support of the United States and allied military operations in the Republic of Vietnam[,] specifically: 2,4-D; 2,4,5-T and its contaminant TCDD; cacodylic acid; and picloram.” 38 C.F.R. § (a)(6)(i).


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Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved by United States. General Accounting Office Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved: report. [United States. General Accounting Office.] -- Extract: Since Vietnam veterans have been contacting the Veterans Administration about health problems which they believe were caused by exposure to herbicides in Vietnam.

Get this from a library. Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved: report. [United States. General Accounting Office.] -- The Department of Defense (DOD) carried out military herbicide operations in South Vietnam from to Herbicide Orange, the most widely used herbicide, contains a contaminant, dioxin, that is.

Health Effects Of Exposure To Herbicide Orange In South Vietnam Should Be Resolved Since Vietnam veterans have been con-tacting the Veterans Administration about health problems which they believe were caused by exposure to herbicides in Vietnam.

Problems in identifying personnel exposed to herbicides and determining the possible health. The book describes research areas of continuing concern and offers recommendations for further research on the health effects of Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam veterans.

This volume will be critically important to both policymakers and physicians in the federal government, Vietnam veterans and their families, veterans organizations. Review of the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides–Eleventh Biennial Update Share and cacodylic acid made up the bulk of the herbicides sprayed.

The main chemical mixture sprayed was Agent Orange, a mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. At the time of the spraying, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most. The assessment of human exposure continues to be a key element in addressing two of the charges that guide the work of this committee.

This chapter first presents background information on the military use of herbicides in Vietnam from to with a review of our knowledge about the exposures of those who served in Vietnam and of the Vietnamese population to the herbicides and to the.

Because of complaints from returning Vietnam veterans about their own health and that of their children combined with emerging toxicologic evidence of adverse effects of phenoxy herbicides and TCDD, the National Academy of Sciences was asked to perform a comprehensive evaluation of scientific and medical information regarding the health effects.

Assessment of human exposure is a key element in addressing two of the charges that guide the work of this committee. This chapter first presents background information on the military use of herbicides in Vietnam from to with a review of our knowledge of exposures of those who served in Vietnam and of the Vietnamese population to the herbicides and to the contaminant 2,3,7,8.

The two active ingredients in the Agent Orange herbicide combination were equal amounts of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), which contained traces of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

The dioxin TCDD was an unwanted byproduct of herbicide production. Dioxins are pollutants that. Agent Orange was a powerful herbicide used by U.S.

military forces during the Vietnam War to eliminate forest cover and crops for North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops. The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent.

The Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health Study is a study of 4, Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps sometime between – to determine if high blood pressure (hypertension) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are.

"While the type of study conducted, a cross-sectional study, cannot be sure of cause, it does demonstrate an association between exposure to Agent Orange with its dioxin contamination and elevated blood pressure," says Dr. Arnold Schecter, a Vietnam-era veteran, dioxin scientist and adjunct professor at the University of Louisville Medical School and School of Public Health and Information.

Characterizing Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam is the IOM's report that evaluates models of herbicide reconstruction to develop and test models of herbicide exposure for use in studies of Vietnam veterans.

Table of Contents. Front Matter; Introduction and Background; Foundation for FindingsFormat: Paperback. Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aspects of environmental fate and low bioavailability of TCDD are consistent with few, if any, ground troop veterans being exposed to Agent Orange.

ABSTRACT. Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aspects of environmental fate and low bioavailability of TCDD are consistent with few, if any, ground troop veterans being exposed to Agent Orange.

New Study Could Pressure VA to Expand Agent Orange Benefits. More than four decades after the end of the Vietnam War, research is still. to describe Vietnam after the United States military dropped the herbicide Agent Orange on their landscape.

Agent Orange is an extremely powerful herbicide that was used in the Vietnam War. The health risks outweigh the benefits greatly, as even today. The United States and Vietnam set up a decontamination effort several years ago in Da Nang, a city in Central Vietnam that was once the site of a U.S.

airbase that stored Agent Orange. It. Agent Orange was a chemical defoliant widely used by the U.S. military during the Vietnam War from to The herbicide contained dangerous dioxins. "Existing Agent Orange and dioxin research is primarily medical in nature, focusing on the details of human exposure primarily through skin contact and long-term health effects on U.S.

Health problems among U.S. military personnel exposed to herbicides during the Vietnam War () emerged in the late s, yet few peer-reviewed studies exist on long-range health effects of these exposures on soldiers, civilians, or the general environment.Agent Orange is a chemical weapon most notably used by the U.S.

Military during the Vietnam War, classified as primary purpose was strategic deforestation, destroying the forest cover and food resources necessary for the implementation and sustainability of the North Vietnamese style of guerilla warfare.

The U.S. Agent Orange usage reached an apex during Operation Ranch Hand, in.In the late s, evidence linking dioxins to birth defects in mice and reports of birth defects in Vietnam began to arise.

2 On October 31 ofthe U.S. ceased tactical herbicide missions in Vietnam. 7 One year prior to this cessation, Congress had urged the Department of Defense to work in unison with the National Academy of Sciences to.